Do this now: DIY wall hooks made from fallen branches

Had to share this super creative, cute, and cost-effective storage solution from the Finnish design website Dekolehti.

DE0609-ekodesign-oksakoukut-27463791

The project is so incredibly simple to pull off I feel like a dummy for not trying it sooner. There really is nothing to it beyond getting your hands on some good hook-like branches, sanding them down and painting them up and you’ve got yourself a set of wall hooks that cost next-to-nothing and are oh so precious on the wall.

unnamed

_DSC9679

branchhooks branckhooks DIYbranchhooks Doodle House Branch Hooks


Shifting landscapes

Traipsing across the parking lot of the Home Depot this afternoon, I was confronted with a harsh, and deeply unpleasant reality. As the vicious sun attacked my helpless pupils and a band of sweat hugged the back of my neck, there was no more denying the truth. Summer is coming.

Austin has been blessed this year with an uncharacteristically long spring season. A mild winter was followed by an outpour of restorative rains that resulted in a long and fruitful growing season, cool spring afternoons and many a porch beer.

The encroaching heat serves as a disappointing reminder that soon we will replace counting fire flies over IPAs with swatting mosquitoes over profanities. The end is nigh, but I am careful NOT to take for granted the swath of magical spring nights we were fortunate enough to enjoy before the season turned against us. Not just this year, but every year. The garden has seen some amazing transformation since we first made it ours some 4 years back.

veggiegardensveggiegarden

sidepatio

palletplanterfrontyard2

frontdriveway

backyardwideangledoodlehousefrontyards

backyardwhole

backyard2011-2015

backpatio


The office gets a face lift

I have found there are some things in life that, try as I might, are more-or-less inevitable. It goes without saying that at some point throughout the year I will:

  1. Get a sunburn
  2. Eat too many girl scout cookies
  3. Buy a gallon of blue paint with which to makeover a room in House Doodle.

While there is currently an empty box of Samoas (formerly Caramel DeLites, formerly Samoas) sitting in my recycling bin, I am writing today about Inevitable Life Event Number Three: Blue Re-Do!

This time, the office would be the victim of The Doodle House Blues. It was, after all, the only room in the house that still boasted the same bland beige color chosen by the previous owners. Yes, a renovation was clearly in order.

 

eclecticoffice

Our office gets a lot of use. A studious history teacher, Heath uses the space to prep (mentally and academically) for his lectures, and as a frequent work-from-home gal, I wanted a place where I would feel productive and comfortable. There were two inspiration rooms that I chose to emulate for our new work space.

From Elle Decore, John Robshaw’s New York City Home:

10be6a1c52b91f8a36fb88efb54e02cd

And from Houzz, this sophisticated and cozy work space:

eclectic-home-office

Heath has always longed for a stately, near presidential, library in which to pour over his history texts, while I tend to prefer a more eclectic atmosphere. I liked that both of these spaces found a way to mix textures, color and patterns to create areas that feel both formal and welcoming. Common elements were the vintage oriental rugs, tufted seating, dark wall colors and minimalist desks. We could work with that.

In an attempt to create a home library, also on the wish list for the new space was a wall of books. Inspired by a bracketed bookshelf some of our pals recently installed in their new rental, we figured we could  try something similar in our home office.

0d4e50e2f005e256f4079a5627ce8b14 cd289c798a28851aceea5164eba27046 Maya-shelves e24cac69eb8d541798e4731263aac438

 

We are both pretty pleased with how things turned out.

doodle house office before

doodle house office makeover

 

Aside from the paint job and shelving, here’s what we did to update the space:

  • Replaced the pink day bed with a green chesterfield sofa, picked up for an extremely affordable price thanks to the always great Room Service Vintage
  • Exchanged the flimsy plastic blinds for bamboo Roman shades
  • Added an oriental rug (formerly from our living room)
  • Spray painted the file cabinets white
  •  Added hair pin legs to the desktop
  • Added an Eames-inspired desk chair
  • Exchanged Stella in the photo for Wyatt (Stella will have nothing to do with the new office, she is deathly afraid of the sheep skin throw…that’s a whole other deal.)

I’d still like to switch out the ’70s ceiling fan at some point, but all-in-all we’re both head over heels for the new space.

comfy eclectic home officechesterfield couch office blue home officeeclectic blue home office

kilim rug home office

Working from home has never been more enjoyable.

 

 

 

 

 

 


D-I-(wh)Y did I do that? or How to Destroy a Perfectly Good Dresser

About a year ago I picked up a free chest of drawers that were in good shape, of a nice size and functional but not exactly the sweetest piece of eye candy. Naturally, I took it upon myself to correct this problem.

Dresser before

You see, for quite some time now, I’ve been operating under the assumption that I am, relatively speaking, crafty and capable. I’ve taken old upholstery off chairs and put new covers on. I’ve constructed floating office shelves and painted an only partially crooked stencil pattern on an accent wall among other things. Maybe I’m no Martha Stewart but I’m no rube either. This, it turns out, is a very dangerous perception under which to operate. Oh self-esteem…how terribly you have betrayed me.

Armed with just the right amount of misguided confidence, I set about to turn this humble clothing receptacle into a work of art so grand, and creative and magnetic that furniture designers the world over would gaze upon it and come to me, weeping, begging for me to share my gift with them. A reasonable expectation. My ingenious scheme, you ask? Simple chevron stripes painted across the drawers. Something a la this:

75283430e600e84abc60aa793c501adb

Perhaps my idea wasn’t all that daring, but all the more reason to believe I could successfully pull this off.

Nope.

The plan revolved around retaining the essence of the existing cloudy gold color, but to bring it some bold contrast with rich, blue stripes. Somehow, that seemed like a wise decision. Gold gives it some spunk. Deep blue makes it a little more grown up and not quite so “glam girl.” It can be a pretty dope look.

idontlike itgooutside images

c714bb35144f23ab1abc3533b7d0cb53 blue-and-gold-inspired-draper-dresser Screen shot 2013-06-17 at 7.59.50 AM_large_jpg

Of course, that’s only in the instance that god forsaken cans of gold spray paint don’t suck the soul out of your body in the process of achieving it. I don’t want to entirely blame my tools as there was most definitely some user error in the process of destroying the integrity of this once fine dresser, but the project first started to go off the rails with the damned spray paint. After I had puttied and sanded the dresser with all the meticulousness I could muster,  I applied the spray paint, only to find that it bubbled and conformed to itself in little bumpy clusters that gave the drawers the texture of lizard skin. I rightfully abandoned the spray paint idea and instead selected a traditional interior paint in the shade of “turmeric” to replace it. You may be surprised to hear this, but “turmeric” and “gold” are not the same color. It actually probably doesn’t surprise anyone but somehow it took me until I was staring at the finished product to truly come to grips with the fact that instead of a sleek blue dresser with some punchy golden flair, I had instead applied the same royal blue and orangey-yellow color scheme used by the University of Delaware’s mascot.

ebafee1f837ef591838511c08a77d1dc

unnamed

 

Oh the humanity!

To really add insult to injury, the knobs I had selected for the new (but not improved) dresser were duds. And expensive duds at that: $14-a-piece from Anthropologie but the knobs pulled right off the screws when you opened the drawers.This made the finished dresser both comically ugly and non functional. I’d give myself a hand for so artfully destroying a needed piece of furniture, but I’d probably screw that up too.

More on the fugly dresser saga to come….


Foto Friday: There’s a Yankee in the Doodle House (how dandy!)

It’s Picture Day today at the middle school where Heath teaches. With this in mind, I’m resurrecting Foto Friday this week because everyone deserves to see the outfit my favorite history teacher chose to grace the pages of the RBMS yearbook.

unnamed

Is he a great teacher or what?

(Props go to Mama Joy for making such a kick ass Yankee uniform.)


Shelf Life

It’s funny how there are some plans you stew and stew over before putting them into action, while others seem to be executed nearly immediately. The latter was the case for my most recent DIY–installing a set of shelves in the corner of our office. A routine Saturday browsing of the internets led me to stumble across a photo of an ingenious design for wall mounted display shelves that I felt compelled to emulate post haste.

100_41521

 

100_4161

 

Normally, I think it’s best to leave corners open and free of clutter, but there is so much I love about this design from A Home West. I think it’s a super way to display the artifacts that help define us while still maximizing storage capacity. And since storage has always been an issue for Heath and myself–I’m a bit of an impulse buyer, Heath’s got a smidge of hoarder in him–this solution seemed ideal for both storing Heath’s collection of history books and my random assortment of knick knacks. I don’t exaggerate when I say fewer than 10 minutes passed from the moment I stumbled across this clever home remedy and when I departed to Home Depot for supplies. A couple of hours later, the office was rejuvenated.

officeshelvesbeforeandafter 

DIYofficewallshelves shelvesincorner

shelfbrackets

 

It turned out to be an incredibly simple, fast, and affordable way to freshen up a neglected space. We already had the wood from an old project Heath and I worked on at our last house, which, coincidentally, was also one we embarked on to create storage in our old office. So the only real cost was the hardware:

  • 20 1/2-inch wood screws (four for each shelf)
  • 10 L-shaped brackets
  • 20 washers
  • 20 metal anchor screws
  • 20 3-inch wall screws
  • Black spray paint

That was it! I think I spent something like $34 total and a Saturday afternoon to see the transformation through to fruition. I still need to stain the edges of the shelves, and I’ll admit, I kind of miss my map wall, but my lust for this new unit is keeping me pretty satisfied.

eclecticoffice

 

 

 


May flowers

Not to be self congratulatory or anything, but Heath and I are basically American heroes for making good on our promise to the garden to give it some much needed TLC.  Austin’s been gifted with a pretty spectacular spring season, which made it nearly impossible for us not to get our hands dirty these past couple months beautifying the grounds of House Doodle. Veggies have been planted, bottle trees erected, new fences built—a productive spring season indeed.

raised beds and chicken cooptexasnativegarden

texassucculents

greyhousegreendoorraingarden marblemulch  doodlehouseroses crushedgranitepatio _DSC7936  _DSC7940 doodlehouserosebouquet bottletree _DSC7935

patio

_DSC7939

 

 


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 14,232 other followers